Green tea provides an efficaciously dosed supplement including the key polyphenols epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). EGCG is a powerful antioxidant with in-depth research, here are some of the potential benefits:

  • Beneficial antioxidants, include EGCG.
  • Helps with liver detoxification.
  • Aids in immune system function.
  • Can possibly promote weight loss when combined with a calorie-controlled diet.
  • Supports cellular growth and repair.
  • Aids in healthy cholesterol levels which are already within a normal range.


Great Source of Antioxidants and Polyphenols.

Antioxidants are a powerful substance that can help combat reactive oxygen species and other research showing they can provide numerous health benefits. Although vitamin C is known as a key antioxidant, EGCG content actually provides between 25 and 100 times higher levels! Because CAPLabs Green Tea is dosed with 98% polyphenols, it has 240mg of EGCG which is the equivalent to around 5 cups of green tea.

Summary of the Research on Green Tea

Green tea has been used in ancient alternative medicine for centuries and in recent years, has had numerous research studies conducted to research and test what amazing health benefits it actually provides. So far, over 100 independent research studies have shown potential health benefits which may include…

  • May help maintain triglyceride and cholesterol levels within a normal healthy range, including unhealthy LDL cholesterol particles.
  • May aid in cell membrane health.
  • May possibly promote body fat and weight loss as part of a calorie controlled diet.
  • May scavenge and destroy ROS (reactive oxygen species) that can cause cell damage.
  • May aid in cell proliferation, the creation and splitting off new cells within the body.
  • May support a healthy immune system.
  • May have a protective role on brain tissue.

*IMPORTANT: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. All information and potential benefits discussed in this video are the opinion of Rudy Mawer, MS based on his research and the current scientific literature.

Research & References

1.) Stendell‐Hollis, N. R., Thomson, C. A., Thompson, P. A., Bea, J. W., Cussler, E. C., & Hakim, I. A. (2010). Green tea improves metabolic biomarkers, not weight or body composition: a pilot study in overweight breast cancer survivors. Journal of human nutrition and dietetics, 23(6), 590-600.

2.) Wang, H., Wen, Y., Du, Y., Yan, X., Guo, H., Rycroft, J. A., … & Mela, D. J. (2010). Effects of catechin enriched green tea on body composition. Obesity, 18(4), 773-779.

3.) Matsuyama, T., Tanaka, Y., Kamimaki, I., Nagao, T., & Tokimitsu, I. (2008). Catechin safely improved higher levels of fatness, blood pressure, and cholesterol in children. Obesity, 16(6), 1338-1348.

4.) Maki, K. C., Reeves, M. S., Farmer, M., Yasunaga, K., Matsuo, N., Katsuragi, Y., … & Blumberg, J. B. (2009). Green tea catechin consumption enhances exercise-induced abdominal fat loss in overweight and obese adults. The Journal of nutrition, 139(2), 264-270.

5.) Hursel, R., Viechtbauer, W., & Westerterp-Plantenga, M. S. (2009). The effects of green tea on weight loss and weight maintenance: a meta-analysis. International journal of obesity, 33(9), 956-961.

6.) Hursel, R., Viechtbauer, W., Dulloo, A. G., Tremblay, A., Tappy, L., Rumpler, W., & Westerterp‐Plantenga, M. S. (2011). The effects of catechin rich teas and caffeine on energy expenditure and fat oxidation: a meta‐analysis. Obesity reviews, 12(7), e573-e581.

7.) Richards, J. C., Lonac, M. C., Johnson, T. K., Schweder, M. M., & Bell, C. (2010). Epigallocatechin-3-gallate increases maximal oxygen uptake in adult humans. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 42(4), 739.

8.) Venables, M. C., Hulston, C. J., Cox, H. R., & Jeukendrup, A. E. (2008). Green tea extract ingestion, fat oxidation, and glucose tolerance in healthy humans. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 87(3), 778-784.

9.) Ichinose, T., Nomura, S., Someya, Y., Akimoto, S., Tachiyashiki, K., & Imaizumi, K. (2011). Effect of endurance training supplemented with green tea extract on substrate metabolism during exercise in humans. Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports, 21(4), 598-605.

10.) Kerksick, C. M., Kreider, R. B., & Willoughby, D. S. (2010). Intramuscular adaptations to eccentric exercise and antioxidant supplementation. Amino Acids, 39(1), 219-232.

11.) Heinrich, U., Moore, C. E., De Spirt, S., Tronnier, H., & Stahl, W. (2011). Green tea polyphenols provide photoprotection, increase microcirculation, and modulate skin properties of women. The Journal of nutrition, 141(6), 1202-1208.

12.) Batista, G. A., da Cunha, C. L. P., Scartezini, M., von der Heyde, R., Bitencourt, M. G., & de Melo, S. F. (2009). Prospective double-blind crossover study of Camellia sinensis (green tea) in dyslipidemias. Arq Bras Cardio, 93, 21-127.

13.) Hursel, R., Viechtbauer, W., Dulloo, A. G., Tremblay, A., Tappy, L., Rumpler, W., & Westerterp‐Plantenga, M. S. (2011). The effects of catechin rich teas and caffeine on energy expenditure and fat oxidation: a meta‐analysis. Obesity reviews, 12(7), e573-e581.

14.) Hua, C. H., Liao, Y. L., Lin, S. C., Tsai, T. H., Huang, C. J., & Chou, P. (2011). Does supplementation with green tea extract improve insulin resistance in obese type 2 diabetics? A randomized, double-blind, and placebocontrolled clinical trial. Alternative Medicine Review, 16(2), 157-163.

15.) Venables, M. C., Hulston, C. J., Cox, H. R., & Jeukendrup, A. E. (2008). Green tea extract ingestion, fat oxidation, and glucose tolerance in healthy humans. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 87(3), 778-784.

16.) Wu, A. H., Spicer, D., Stanczyk, F. Z., Tseng, C., Yang, C. S., & Pike, M. C. (2012). Effect of 2-month controlled green tea intervention on lipoprotein cholesterol, glucose, and hormonal levels in healthy postmenopausal women. Cancer Prevention Research, canprevres-0407.

17.) Hsu, C. H., Tsai, T. H., Kao, Y. H., Hwang, K. C., Tseng, T. Y., & Chou, P. (2008). Effect of green tea extract on obese women: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Clinical nutrition, 27(3), 363-370.

18.) Brown, A. L., Lane, J., Coverly, J., Stocks, J., Jackson, S., Stephen, A., … & Hendrickx, H. (2009). Effects of dietary supplementation with the green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate on insulin resistance and associated metabolic risk factors: randomized controlled trial. British journal of nutrition, 101(06), 886-894.

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